epcot

conjurdude


El chupacabra tomó mis pantalones

el Jesús grande de la mantequilla


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some randomness
epcot
conjurdude
another funny quote from a past episode of "The West Wing":
Sam: "I'm less visually observant than others, but I make up for it."
Random Coast Guard Lieutenant: "How?"
Sam: "With cunning and guile."
a fun little joke:
Q: How many guitar players does it take to cover "Smoke on the Water?"
A: All of them, apparently.
and some other miscellany:

I watched the NBC miniseries "10.5" last night and tonight. Interesting premise. Shoddy screenwriting. Not much scientific basis. Abysmal cinematography. If you didn't see it, imagine a student film, commissioned by MTV to have as many active camera shots as possible (zooms in and out several times in a single shot) and given a ridiculously large budget for Special FX. That, in a nutshell, was "10.5." I don't even think the Richter Scale goes up to 10.5. I thought it was a logarithmic scale that maxed out at 10. Maybe I'm wrong, but it wouldn't be the only case of bad science in the miniseries.

Edit: A correction: the Richter scale has no upper limit. However, according to the California Department of Conservation website posting some follow-ups to the bad science in "10.5," a quake measuring 10.5 on the Richter scale could occur, but only if you had a subduction zone about 6000 miles long. Since there are no subduction boundaries that run the distance of the North Pole to the Equator, it's not gonna happen. As a further note, a 10.5 quake would be 32 times more powerful than the 1960 Chilean earthquake, measuring 9.5 on Richter, or about 1 million times more powerful than the 1994 Northridge CA quake (6.5 on Richter). One more fun fact; a quake of Richter 12.0 would be enough to fault the earth in half through the center, equivalent to 160 TRILLION tons of TNT going off at once. However, that's also equivalent to the amount of energy the earth receives from the sun every day. There, don't say you never learn anything from me.

I also watched two episodes of "The Restaurant" on Bravo. This may be the only reality series I can stomach (unless you include "Trading Spaces" in the "reality" category). I can see some things that others might not catch, since I work in a restaurant. I can see both sides of the issue, both corporate and the location itself. I do feel that corporate is being unreasonable in expecting the restaurant to be like other restaurants that it owns, in that by its very nature of being so intricately involved in a television show, it's changing the very nature of the place. People aren't going to go there to dine so much as they're going to go there to see a place they saw on TV and maybe be on TV themselves. I also think that corporate is not taking into consideration the importance of Chef Rocco's publicity junket. It seems like corporate is resenting the success he's enjoying, even if it is on a personal level, rather than on the level of the restaurant as a whole. Any positive press Rocco gets, however, is going to reflect favorably on the restaurant, and draw more people there, even if it is just to gawk. I do appreciate that the restaurant is losing money, but I'm again wondering if the intrusive nature of the TV series isn't playing into that, as well. Many people on the episodes I saw are getting a bit indignant that Rocco isn't there (he was doing a lot of publicity in the two episodes I watched). Did corporate not plan for this contingency; a success of this magnitude? People are going to come and gawk and get a drink, and look at the menu and see that the prices are high and just get an appetizer. Labor costs are high because pressure of being on TV is going to stress a lot of people out and lead to high labor turnover after large amounts of money have been spent in training. Corporate just doesn't seem to realize that they can't judge this restaurant by the same set of rules as their other, non-reality-TV-involved places.

Sorry, I'm over-analyzing. It's kind of my job at work. I'm supposed to look at things and see if I can predict or at the very least prepare for what may occur. It might not, but I'd rather have a plan set up for dealing with a series of small disasters that may never come up than be sitting around while they merge into one huge one. I think I'd be a good manager there, but we'll see if that happens anytime in the future.

Still waiting to hear from Penzey's, though. Which would cut into my availability if work does want to make me a manager. Who knows?

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